Environmental Emergency Preparedness and Response Webinar banner

Register today for the Environmental Emergency Preparedness and Response Webinar Series

Large-scale environmental incidents and emergency events such as fires, floods, dam failures, and oil spills can and do occur in Michigan and have the potential to cause devastating impacts to human health and the environment. However, the damage caused by these disasters can be mitigated with proper preparedness and response. This webinar series is focused on helping business, industry, government, and the spill response community understand the complexities of preparing for and responding to large-scale environmental incidents and will provide an understanding of the various associated roles, responsibilities, regulations, and response technologies. A question and answer period will follow each presentation. Recordings of each webinar will be available on the Series webpage.

Upcoming Webinars in the Series

December 1, 10:00 - 11:00 a.m.
Preparing for the Worst but Hoping For the Best

Note: this webinar was previously scheduled for 10/20/21 and was changed to 12/1/21.
Well before responding to an environmental emergency and even before it occurs, a plan for the incident has already been developed. Incident planning may be the single best way to facilitate coordination, decrease response times, mobilize resources, and identify sensitive areas, and just as the response requires the involvement of various agencies, organizations, and private industry across all levels of government, so does incident planning. This presentation will include a summary of environmental emergency planning activities in Michigan, including facility response plans, integrated contingency plans, geographic response plans, and area contingency plans as well as how you can become involved in incident planning.


January 20, 10:00 - 11:00 a.m.
Dam Safety and Preparedness: It Takes A Community Working Together

Dams can serve an important role in a community as a water supply, hydroelectric generation, flood protection, and recreation. However, dam failures can pose a significant threat to public health and safety and can also cause millions of dollars in property and environmental damages. The Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE) Dam Safety Program is responsible for administering Michigan's dam safety statute which ensures that regulated dams are properly constructed, inspected, and maintained, and that dam owners are adequately prepared for potential emergencies. However, it is also up to the community to ensure it is prepared for a dam safety incident. This presentation will provide an overview of EGLE's Dam Safety Program, a discussion of the partners and their roles in preventing and responding to dam emergencies, and a question and answer session.
Registration button EGLE Blue

Michigan.gov/EGLEevents

PROGRAM QUESTIONS:
Ryan Blazic: BlazicR@Michigan.gov
REGISTRATION QUESTIONS:
Alana Berthold: BertholdA@Michigan.gov
Joel Roseberry: RoseberryJ@Michigan.gov

Individuals needing language assistance or accommodations for effective participation at these events should contact Joel Roseberry at 517-599-9494 at least two weeks before the event to request language, mobility, visual, hearing, translation, and/or other assistance.
EGLE does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, religion, age, national origin, color, marital status, disability, political beliefs, height, weight, genetic information, or sexual orientation in the administration of any of its programs or activities, and prohibits intimidation and retaliation, as required by applicable laws and regulations.

Environmental Emergency Preparedness and Response Webinar banner

Register today for the Environmental Emergency Preparedness and Response Webinar Series

Large-scale environmental incidents and emergency events such as fires, floods, dam failures, and oil spills can and do occur in Michigan and have the potential to cause devastating impacts to human health and the environment. However, the damage caused by these disasters can be mitigated with proper preparedness and response. This webinar series is focused on helping business, industry, government, and the spill response community understand the complexities of preparing for and responding to large-scale environmental incidents and will provide an understanding of the various associated roles, responsibilities, regulations, and response technologies. A question and answer period will follow each presentation. Recordings of each webinar will be available on the Series webpage.

Upcoming Webinars in the Series

December 1, 10:00 - 11:00 a.m.
Preparing for the Worst but Hoping For the Best

Note: this webinar was previously scheduled for 10/20/21 and was changed to 12/1/21.
Well before responding to an environmental emergency and even before it occurs, a plan for the incident has already been developed. Incident planning may be the single best way to facilitate coordination, decrease response times, mobilize resources, and identify sensitive areas, and just as the response requires the involvement of various agencies, organizations, and private industry across all levels of government, so does incident planning. This presentation will include a summary of environmental emergency planning activities in Michigan, including facility response plans, integrated contingency plans, geographic response plans, and area contingency plans as well as how you can become involved in incident planning.


January 20, 10:00 - 11:00 a.m.
Dam Safety and Preparedness: It Takes A Community Working Together

Dams can serve an important role in a community as a water supply, hydroelectric generation, flood protection, and recreation. However, dam failures can pose a significant threat to public health and safety and can also cause millions of dollars in property and environmental damages. The Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE) Dam Safety Program is responsible for administering Michigan's dam safety statute which ensures that regulated dams are properly constructed, inspected, and maintained, and that dam owners are adequately prepared for potential emergencies. However, it is also up to the community to ensure it is prepared for a dam safety incident. This presentation will provide an overview of EGLE's Dam Safety Program, a discussion of the partners and their roles in preventing and responding to dam emergencies, and a question and answer session.
Registration button EGLE Blue

Michigan.gov/EGLEevents

PROGRAM QUESTIONS:
Ryan Blazic: BlazicR@Michigan.gov
REGISTRATION QUESTIONS:
Alana Berthold: BertholdA@Michigan.gov
Joel Roseberry: RoseberryJ@Michigan.gov

Individuals needing language assistance or accommodations for effective participation at these events should contact Joel Roseberry at 517-599-9494 at least two weeks before the event to request language, mobility, visual, hearing, translation, and/or other assistance.
EGLE does not discriminate on the basis of race, sex, religion, age, national origin, color, marital status, disability, political beliefs, height, weight, genetic information, or sexual orientation in the administration of any of its programs or activities, and prohibits intimidation and retaliation, as required by applicable laws and regulations.

EGLE COVID-19 RESPONSE:
For details on EGLE's work during the pandemic, visit our COVID-19 response webpage. Follow state actions and guidelines at Michigan.gov/Coronavirus.
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NotMISpecies Webinar Series

Invasive species pose a threat to Michigan’s environment, economy, and sometimes even human health. What is at stake? What is being done? This webinar series explores how agencies, universities, and locally-led organizations are working together to protect Michigan’s natural resources through the Michigan Invasive Species Program. If you are concerned about the impacts of invasive species or interested in the techniques used to control them, join us as we examine species-specific actions, innovations in research and technology, and programs designed to help communities prevent and manage harmful invasive species. A question and answer period will follow each presentation. You can view webinar recordings on the NotMiSpecies Webinar Series page.

Upcoming webinars in the series

January 25, 2022, 9:00 - 10:00 a.m.
Dive into the gene pool: Using environmental DNA to detect
invasive species

How can you find an aquatic invasive species that you can’t see? You sample the water where it might be and search for its DNA instead! Join Nick Frohnauer of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Kim Scribner and John Robinson from Michigan State University to learn about this fascinating technique that researchers are using to detect invasive carp and other aquatic invasive species before they become established in the Great Lakes region.

February 16, 2022, 9:00 - 10:00 a.m.
The AIS-Team: Conservation officers on a mission to prevent
invasive species

Whether it’s tracking invasive species imports or making sure boaters “Clean, Drain, and Dry,” conservation officers play a key role in Michigan’s Invasive Species Program. Corporal Nick Torsky of the Department of Natural Resources, Law Enforcement Division’s Great Lakes Enforcement Unit will discuss the unit’s role in the battle against aquatic invasive species. Join Corporal Torsky to learn more about enforcement of boating and bait-related regulations, oversight of Michigan’s organisms-in-trade, interagency cooperation across the Great Lakes Basin, and some recent investigations that highlight the Department’s enforcement efforts.

Registration button EGLE Blue

Michigan.gov/EGLEevents

REGISTRATION QUESTIONS:
Alana Berthold: BertholdA@michigan.gov
Joel Roseberry: RoseberryJ@michigan.gov

AIS agency footer


Individuals needing language assistance or accommodations for effective participation at these events should contact Joel Roseberry at 517-599-9494 at least two weeks before each event to request language, mobility, visual, hearing, translation, and/or other assistance.